The Sniffer, Feb 17th, 2012: Trends in Crowdsourced Funding and Cool Info Management

For this trendwatching podcast, Cathi Bond has been keeping an eye on who’s raising funds on Kickstarter. She found this family farm hoping to raise pigs and take production all the way to cured pork products. People seem to have an increasing appetite for putting their money into specific projects that they can have some sense of agency over; witness the success of projects like Kiva.

Meanwhile, Nora Young recalls the cute wi-fi rabbit, Nabaztag. Perhaps it was just a little ahead of its time, since we’re seeing all sorts of charming display tools aimed at helping us get a grip on all the information that’s coming at us. Nora points to two good examples: Feedair (via Gizmag) and Little Printer, by the folks at BERG. Little Printer is particularly distinct because it, well, prints things out on paper. Amidst all our electronic means for keeping tabs, is there still a role for paper lists in your life? Let us know!

4 Responses to The Sniffer, Feb 17th, 2012: Trends in Crowdsourced Funding and Cool Info Management

  1. Hi, guys,

    I can totally get behind the paper list thing.
    I have been fairly deliberately trying to centralize all my information into my Device, including things like to-do lists. However, the other day I found myself instead writing down one such list and posting it on the fridge. In a sense, having it on a small screen that goes in my pocket it can easily get lost among everything else.
    It’s like, for example: there was a new album being released from a series I really like, and I tried to find it in CD form rather than download it — as a disc it was An Album that I could play; digitally it was simply being added to a library of all my music, a few tracks in amongst the whole of the songs there.
    If listening to a song, say, on my computer, I can hit a button to skip track or go to an entirely different genre of music if the whim takes me, instead of working to get really into the song or album I’m on if I was listening to it on something like a discman; if I’m checking a to-do list on my Device, I can just as easily decide to check my email or surf the web, instead of this ‘thing’ sitting on the face of my fridge that I can’t avoid or inadvertently hide.

    – Liquid

  2. I totally agree with you, Liquid. I think the turf in the future is going to be finding ways to create *meaningful* information/lists for people. The business model for some companies may lie in getting users to contribute as much personal info as possible, but from a UX perspective, it’s about less, yet more meaningful information. Thanks for your great comment!

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  4. Hey Liquid you’re dead on. Last year I went to the BB as my centralized device and the whole experience was one of annoyance and something that’s hard to pin down. I never really felt like I truly knew what I was supposed to be doing, when and where. I know that this sounds weird and vague, but it’s true. Same thing with music. I am returning to vinyl and because it sounds way more human, but more expensive (kind of like saving up your allowance back in the day to buy something) so I’m really listening to them a lot more carefully and not making the same level of disposable purchases I would do on iTunes. I’ve got SO much music in my computer, but again, like the BB, it doesn’t feel real to me. LIke it’s mine. LIke it’s special or something.

    Thanks for the post.